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How to Use Crutches, Canes, and Walkers Professional

3 weeks ago Multimedia Battambang   12 views

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If you break a bone in your leg or foot, have a procedure on your knee or lower leg, or suffer a stroke, your doctor may recommend that you use a walking aid while you are healing or recovering. Using crutches, a cane, or a walker can help keep your weight off your injured or weak leg, assist with balance, and enable you to perform your daily activities more safely.

When you are first learning to use your walking aid, you may wish to have a friend or family member nearby to help steady you and give you support. In the beginning, everything you do may seem more difficult. With just a few tips and a little practice, though, most people are able to quickly gain confidence and learn how to use a walking aid safely.

Walking Cane can be helpful if you have minor problems with balance or stability, some weakness in your leg or trunk, an injury, or a pain. If you are elderly, using a single point cane may help you to walk more comfortably and safely and, in some cases, may make it easier for you to continue living independently.

Crutches

If your injury or surgery requires you to get around without putting any weight on your leg or foot, you may have to use crutches.

Proper Positioning

When standing up straight, the top of your Walking Crutches should be about 1-2 inches below your armpits.

The handgrips of the crutches should be even with the top of your hip line.

Your elbows should be slightly bent when you hold the handgrips.

To avoid damage to the nerves and blood vessels in your armpits, your weight should rest on your hands, not on the underarm supports.

Commode Chair is a portable chair designed for people with disabilities and older people. An easy-care portable chair can be moved at the desired place and has arms to support people to get in and out comfortably.

The commode chairs from Singapore are strong enough to support the people who have put on extra weight. This article aims to highlight the perks of having a commode chair for elderly and disabled people.

Types of Commode Chair

There are many types of commode chairs out there in the market. However, knowing the right kind of commode chair for you can save you a lot of time and stress. Listed below are some of the main types of commode chairs.

  • Static commodes

As the name implies, Static commodes are not mobile commode chairs as they don’t have wheels. However, you can carry them to the required place. These chairs have detachable arms, which eases the process of lateral transfer. Many static commodes also come with handles for a better user experience.

  • Portable commodes

The portable commodes are mobile commode chairs as they come with four wheels and can easily be moved on tiles, carpet, and wooden floors. To provide more privacy to the users, these can be carried over to modern toilets.

Walkers and canes can be lifesavers for older people, but a new study highlights the downside of using them without training.

“A lot of older adults seem to struggle with their Walking Aids . . . they often drag along their walking aids like a burden with a difficult gait pattern as a result, possibly increasing the risk of falling,” said the study’s lead author, Tine Roman de Mettelinge of Ghent University in Belgium.