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How Bad Is It Really to Never Change Your Pillow? Private

1 month ago Real estate Battambang   19 views

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Location: Battambang
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It's no secret that a comfortable, supportive pillow is an important ingredient in a good night's sleep. But what may come as a surprise is how often you're supposed to invest in a new one. According to the Sleep Foundation, you should replace your pillow every one to two years for optimal R&R.

Pillows lose their loft over time, especially if you don't wash them regularly, says Ann Romaker, MD, professor of medicine and director of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Sleep Medicine Center. As they flatten, they offer less neck support, which can lead to neck, shoulder and upper back pain.

If you're uncomfortable, you might toss and turn at night instead of falling into a deep, restorative sleep.

Sleeping on a pancake can also hinder breathing. According to Dr. Romaker, 85 percent of people are born with a deviated nasal septum, where the membrane dividing the nasal cavity is off-center to some degree. This can cause congestion, particularly when lying down.

For most people with a deviated septum, elevating your head helps with nasal drainage, she says. If your travel pillow is quite flat, your nose might clog up more.

The upshot? You're pretty much snoozing in a cesspool of filth — and that can wreak havoc on your skin. The combination of oils, dead skin cells, saliva and sweat are a breeding ground for bacteria, Dr. Frey says. This can cause problems like clogged pores, whiteheads and even cysts.

One way to keep your skin happy while you sleep: Stick to natural, breathable airplane pillowcase fabrics such as cotton or linen. Dr. Frey says they're best for acne-prone or sensitive skin, because they reduce nighttime sweating.

2. You’re Doubling Up

If you find yourself reaching for a second hoodie pillow or sliding your hands underneath your pillow to prop yourself up, that's a sign it's time to recycle it, Dr. Romaker says.

3. The Cover Looks Filthy

I sometimes see people with yellow, stained casings on their pillow, Dr. Romaker says. They've probably been holding onto it for too long.

2. You’re Doubling Up

If you find yourself reaching for a second hoodie pillow or sliding your hands underneath your pillow to prop yourself up, that's a sign it's time to recycle it, Dr. Romaker says.

3. The Cover Looks Filthy

I sometimes see people with yellow, stained casings on their pillow, Dr. Romaker says. They've probably been holding onto it for too long.

2. Cover It Up

Using a zippered allergy-resistant or plastic neck pillowcase cover will decrease the need to wash the entire pillow, Carver says.

3. Change Your Case More Often Than You Think

I recommend washing [your pillowcase] twice a week at a minimum, Dr. Frey says. Using a fresh pillowcase will allow you to cut down the number of times you wash your actual bed pillow to every three to four months.

If you are young and comfy and getting a good night's sleep, then you are fine, Dr. Romaker says. If you wake up tired and sore, then you need to start with a new pillow or cushion, or a back cushion.

People with allergies or breakouts should also try to stick to the two-year guideline.

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