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Are magnetic eyelashes worth the hype? Professional

5 days ago Multimedia Battambang   4 views

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The even bigger news for lash lovers: Reusable magnetic fake lashes—which attach via a thin strip of magnets at the base instead of glue—have recently come on the scene. Intriguingly, I received a kit as a gift, but after one frustrating session trying to master the tweezer-like applicator, I understood why “how to apply magnetic lashes” was Google’s top trending beauty search in 2018. The struggle to get them on has spawned a subgenre of YouTube videos offering either clever hacks or brokenhearted reviews.

These polarized (and polarizing) temporary lashes consist of a set of two lash strips studded with tiny magnets that adhere to each other, sandwiching the wearer’s own upper lashes. They’re typically made of synthetic or human hair, and for a luxe option Uptown Lashes sells a mink set ($30, uptownlashes.com). Some kits, such as the one from One Two Cosmetics, are sold with a tweezer-like applicator included ($69, onetwocosmetics.com). Ardell’s popular lashes are more of a deal starting at $14 a kit, with an applicator sold separately for $4 (ardellshop.com). Some women use tweezers or their fingers to apply the lashes. Though simple in concept, the process is difficult in practice due to the magnets’ minute size and the exacting placement required.

New York-based makeup artist Mary Irwin said that a magnifying mirror could help, and recommends looking down into the mirror so you can see the underside of the lash. Then, dexterous users can “gently drop the top part of the magnetic lash above the natural lash,” which is the step that requires extensive practice. However, Ms. Irwin conceded that “for everyday wear, I don’t think they’re the most practical.” Having studied online tutorials carefully and still failed to apply my own set, I would have to agree.

The boom of eyelash growth serums, lash extension and curling procedures, and lengthening mascaras should prove the point—the world is obsessed with the quest to longer, fuller eyelashes. But despite all this new beauty tech, applying false eyelashes is one tried-and-true trick that makeup artists and celebrities have been using for years. And the surge of magnetic eyelashes hitting the market proves this option isn't one to ignore.

Once only adhered to your natural lash with adhesive glue, mink magnetic eyelashes secure to each other, and your lash line, with tiny magnets. The latest brand to launch this type of technology is celebrated falsies brand, Ardell. According to Jadene Munson, the Global Brand Ambassador, they "feature virtually invisible magnets placed along the lash line that lock together and secure the lash along your natural lash line." This brand's full strip lashes, specifically, feature four magnets for an impressive hold, while the accent lashes feature three magnets. Basically, you are sandwiching your natural eyelashes between two strips held together with magnetic force.

It's relatively simple. Each product will differ slightly, so it's best to follow the instructions on the package. First, it's often recommended to trim the lash so it'll naturally fit along your natural lash line. Then, Munson recommends applying mascara to give your eyelashes more grip. For Ardell's strip eyelashes, the next step is to lay the Upper Magnetic Lash across the top of your lash line. Then, you place the Under Magnetic Lash from the tray and place it underneath your natural lash line. Thanks to the magnets, they will lock in place.

Another popular brand is One Two Cosmetics, seen above. These magnetic lashes come in full strips or half lashes to accent the outer corners. This brand's magnetic lashes also come with an applicator that looks a little like tweezers, but you can apply them with your fingers, too. The same logic applies—the upper lash is magnetically attracted to the bottom—but you can watch this short video for a visual breakdown.

To remove the Ardell lashes, Munson says to gently pull them apart by lifting the top lash up and pulling the bottom one down. You can also slide the top and bottom magnets away from each other "one by one." However, you should never pull them straight off, as this could harm your natural lashes. One Two recommends using your thumb and index finger to slide them apart.

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