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9 truths about bedding Private

1 month ago Multimedia Battambang   15 views

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The thing coming between you and a good night’s sleep might be the thin layer of bedding between you and your mattress.When it comes to improving your sleep, activity leading up to bedtime and the quality of a mattress are more frequently discussed factors, but as it turns out, bed sheets and pillow cases, such as dobby sheets could be the reason you’re not refreshed when you wake up each morning. 

When it comes to improving your sleep, activity leading up to bedtime and the quality of a mattress are more frequently discussed factors, but as it turns out, bed sheets and pillow cases could be the reason you’re not refreshed when you wake up each morning. And, contrary to popular belief, a higher thread count, unto itself, might not be the solution.

1. Higher thread count doesn't always mean higher quality.

Think sheets and pillow cases with 1,000- or 1,500-thread count are more luxurious than those with smaller numbers? Think again. Michael J. Breus, an Arizona-based sleep expert known as "The Sleep Doctor," says thread counts exceeding 500 are redefining the word "thread" because, at that point, "what you're looking at is probably two textiles that are woven together."

Ariel Kaye, the founder and CEO of Parachute, a California-based bedding company, doesn't even mention thread count on her website. "Anything that’s over 400 is a manipulation of fabric or thread," she says. "The problem with higher thread counts is that they use these synthetic finishes; when they dissipate, the sheets are going to be unrecognizable." Both experts recommend thread counts that top out at about 400.

2. Some materials are cooler than others.
Synthetics have a tendency to trap heat, making for a more uncomfortable sleep experience; quality cotton gets better reviews. According to the Parachute website, Kaye’s company uses “Egyptian cotton, combed with precision to remove all impurities.” Breus' preferences are also along those lines. “The bottom line is that pima cotton or an Egyptian cotton are the best materials to use in a sheet," he said. "I, personally, like the sateen type of finish, just because it’s softer." For menopausal women who are prone to hot flashes and night-sweats, Breus often recommends moisture-wicking sheets, which offer next-level coolness.

3. Wash new sheets before you use them.

And, if possible, do that more than once. “Make sure that you wash your embroidery sheets set at least two times before putting them on your bed," Breus said, "because, a lot of times, when they’re in packaging, there are [irritants] that can get on them.”